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Happy 4th of July to all my American friends; enjoy the celebrations!

USA Flag in Seattle, WA, USA

USA Flag in Seattle, WA, USA (August 2013)

Happy Canada Day 2014!

White Rock Pier, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Canada Flag Flying Proudly in White Rock, Vancouver, BC, Canada (March 2013)

Happy Pride from London!

Pride in London #mygaypride

Pride in London #mygaypride

Yesterday, London celebrated its annual pride parade and festival, an event I have been looking forward to for a while, as it is the first time I go to a Pride festival outside of Vancouver. After so much building it up, I’m sad to say I was actually underwhelmed by the parade itself, and I ended up leaving about half way through.

Before I sound like I’m complaining too much, let me assure you I actually had a great time in Pride in London. I honestly think that I am a little jaded, after attending Vancouver Pride multiple times over the years, Pride in London just didn’t cut it for me. The reality is that Vancouver Pride is pretty freaking awesome, a parade that is getting bigger and better, and more colourful, year after year. Vancouver Pride is amongst the top most visited prides in the world, and it’s always a really fun time, and the parade does justice to such an event. Pride in London’s parade to me seemed all over the place.

The weather did not want to cooperate; aside from a couple sunny breaks, there was a downpour for most of the afternoon. Had the weather been nicer, I would have definitely stayed for the whole parade, but water was literally seeping through my umbrella, and I just didn’t feel like being there anymore.

Why didn’t I love the parade of Pride in London?
1. The barricades. Not exactly sure why they needed to barricade spectators from the parade, behind fences. I mean, I understand it is to avoid delays from people getting in the way of the parade itself, but seriously, Vancouver Pride is SO MUCH BIGGER, with a lot more attendees, and somehow there is no need to fence out the spectators. Being fenced out really made me feel like  I was merely a spectator, rather than part of the event.

2. While we’re on the subject of “being a spectator,” I felt like Pride in London lacked interaction between the parade participants (the people marching / aboard floats) and the people watching the parade. Yes, many of them waved their hands, but I often felt like the participants  had great banter going on amongst them, rather than connecting with the people watching. This lack of interaction made me feel even more like I was merely watching a group of people having fun, while I wasn’t really having any. I honestly feel, that the Pride in London parade simply lacked the interaction between participants and watchers, which is what makes a Pride parade fun.

3. Whatever happened to the goodies? One of my favourite part about Vancouver Pride is collecting the bead necklaces… Yes, a little Mardi Gras-wannabe, but it is amazing how much fun it is collecting bead necklaces, or temporary tattoos, or flags, throughout the parade. I enjoy going to the bars afterward and seeing everyone who attended the parade decked out with the colourful beads, and sometimes using that as a platform to begin a conversation with perfect strangers. Pride in London gave nothing away (at least not that I saw, on the part of the parade that I watched).

4. The volunteers and event managers. Yes, this event would not be possible without the time and effort put on by the people who make it happen. These people tried to ensure things would go as smoothly as possible (which didn’t really happen… see point 5 below!), and tried to be cheerful despite the rain. HOWEVER, I honestly felt like they were in the freaking way ALL THE TIME. Bad enough that we were barricaded behind the fence, but at least we had a front row, as we got there early… that was until a group of four of the parade workers decided to stand in front of us, open up their umbrellas, and cover pretty much the entire view. Many of the people around where we were asked politely if they could move a little to avoid being in the way, but the parade workers didn’t move, and seemed more interested in watching the parade themselves with their umbrellas open, so over half of our view, in the front row, was blocked.

5. The parade did not run smoothly. Every float / group of marchers would move a few metres, then stop in a standstill. I am not exactly sure what the delays were, but the portion of the parade that I attended was painful to watch. Meanwhile, the volunteers, event managers, photographers, and others who were working for the parade, had their own over-dramatic show going on. Stewards pushing through the crowd and moving one of the fences to come in and out of the street, continuously. Volunteers and managers yelling at each other from across the street. Workers running from side to side, looking severely frazzled as if whatever was happening was a life or death situation. It was a stressful behind-the-scenes situation, happening right in the spotlight, calling more attention than the parade itself, which for long periods stood still, without music, without dancing, with very few smiling faces.

The weather, as mentioned above, did not collaborate with us, and made the event a little more painful to withstand. This is obviously out of Pride in London’s control, so not something they could have fixed. As the rain started to pour, everyone’s umbrellas got on the way (as I said, even us, being first in row, had our views blocked by the umbrellas of the volunteers). My view on the front row was so bad, I couldn’t even take photos to share with you (and believe me I tried).

Pride Drinks at Ku Bar

Pride Drinks at Ku Bar

And now, on to the good
Alright, so I need to end this on a high note, since after all, despite a disappointing parade, I had a fantastic time at Pride! The parade was a bust, but my friends and I went to a few gay bars throughout the afternoon and into the early hours of the morning, and the Pride atmosphere was great.

To hide from the rain after leaving the parade, we headed over to Retro Bar, which quickly filled up with parade participants and watchers after the parade ended. Afterwards, when the rain subsided, we headed over to Soho, and were able to visit a few bars. The lines were crazy, and everywhere was packed, but the atmosphere was fun and happy. My favourite part about it is that Soho closed many of its streets to traffic, and the area became a huge beer garden of sorts, with everyone enjoying their drinks in the street.

The Pride in London parade could definitely become an incredible event to attend if they change a little the way they do things. The weather couldn’t be helped, but the parade could instantly become better if the procession was more fluid (fewer breaks), the participants were more interactive, and if the crew ran the parade from behind the scenes, rather than in the spotlight, overshadowing the parade itself.

And then there are bead necklaces… is it too much to ask for a little more fun?

Today is the official beginning of Summer, as we celebrate the Summer Solstice. That (usually) means one thing: MORE SUNNY DAYS!

London is incredibly beautiful in the sunshine… here’s a photo I took I took earlier this year in a sunny day. Happy Summer, an enjoy the sun today, everyone!

Big Ben and an Iconic Telephone Booth in the Sun

Big Ben and an Iconic Telephone Booth in the Sun

The 25th of April commemorates ANZAC day, Australia and New Zealand’s most significant war remembrance. Although the day celebrates the lives of the lives of soldiers lost in all wars, its origins go back tot he battles in Gallipoli in World War I, where both nations had the most significant loss of lives.

The Lone Pine Cemetery

The Lone Pine Cemetery

Last September I got to go to the ANZAC Memorial site in Gallipoli, Turkey. While I have visited many ANZAC memorials in Australian and New Zealand cities, the ones in Gallipoli was especially touching.

Set on the seaside, right where thousands of Allied soldiers lost their lives, multiple remembrance sites commemorate the lives of these soldiers, along with a monument depicting an apology letter from Turkey, to the mothers of the soldiers.

I am not one much for war history, but the visit to Gallipoli is quite touching, and a definite must do for Aussies and Kiwis.

I still hold the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics as one of my favourite memories of Living in Vancouver. I still remember the excitement circulating in the city during the entire two weeks of the Olympics. Most dramatic was Canada’s winning the Gold medal on the hockey game over the USA. The excitement!

Me back in the Vancouver 2010 Winter olympics, outside of Canada House.

Me back in the Vancouver 2010 Winter olympics, outside of Canada House.

As Canada prepares to battle for gold again, four years later, at the Sochi Olympics, I am rooting for my country from the UK. Go Canada!

The 15th of January 2014 marks the third anniversary since I got my own domain, specializing my blog into travel-only posts. And what a ride it’s been!

Resting my tired feet in one of the hot spring terraces in Pamukkale, Turkey (September 2013)

Resting my tired feet in one of the hot spring terraces in Pamukkale, Turkey (September 2013)

One year ago I set myself some goals when it came to my blog, with the most ambitious being writing three to four posts per week throughout the year. I started strong, staying true to that goal for the first half of the year (and I did accomplish writing 107 posts in 2013, so not too shabby), but then slowed down a bit, as changes came up.

Which changes, you ask? Well, the most important being my move to London, England, a move that I hope will allow me to travel much more over the next couple of years. With the move across the world, came the stress of finding a place to live, a job, and getting my bearings in a new city. On my way to moving to London, I also went traveling for about two and a half months… and we all know how lazy I get with my writing while I’m on the road!

The good news? I have now visited plenty of new places in six new countries, so I definitely have a LOT more material to write about, and a LOT of photographs to share… so keep tuned!

Thank you again to all my loyal readers and all new visitors, for continuing to follow my blog. It brings me great pleasure to see every time someone visits my blog (and extra pleasure when readers spend a while going through some of my old posts).

Here’s to another year full of travel and adventure! x

I’d like to wish everyone a fantastic 2014. A little late to be writing a New Years post… but hey, better late than never!

Last New Years I reflected on the travel I did in 2012, noting that year had been the one where I had traveled the most in my entire life… so far. It was also then that I came to realize too how important travel has become in my life; perhaps, travel is the one true passion I have.

I’m glad to say, 2013 did not disappoint in terms of travel, and it brought upon a big change: my move to the UK.

The year started a little slower, with my first trip being in April, going down to Playa del Carmen, Mexico, for my brother’s wedding. As much as I love Playa del Carmen, I had been there already (and as recently as one year before), so it seemed 2013 would be less exiting travel-wise.

Thankfully, I made the decision about that time, that maybe I wanted to take on another long-term adventure; since returning to Vancouver from Australia a year prior, my feet had been itching to move on somewhere else yet again. And so, I applied for a work permit to the UK, and was now on my way to a new life.

Figuring a simple move (from work in Canada to work in England) wouldn’t satisfy my urge to travel, I decided to make a bit of a trip before coming to my new life… one thing led to another, and before I knew it I had another extended holiday spanning nearly three months, which included plenty of new cities in new countries I hadn’t visited before: the Netherlands, Belgium, Turkey, England, Wales and Scotland. I also got to visit Rome, Italy, the only European city I’ve re-visited so far, but not since I came to Europe for the first time nearly seven years ago!

A reminder of how much I’ve traveled, yet how little of the world I’ve seen so far, I bought this wall map to inspire me to dream of new adventures every day; the purple stickers mark the places I have visited so far, so I’m hoping to add more and more over the next few years. The map looks at me from the wall opposite my bed in my new flat in London, and I can stare at it for hours on end planning where to go next… oh, and all the travel dreams and plans I have!

My New Map of the World, Showing the Places I Have Visited

My New Map of the World, Showing the Places I Have Visited

So here is to another fantastic year full of travel and adventures, Happy (late) New Years to everyone, and thank you for reading!

-CG xx

Walter Elias “Walt” Disney was born December 5, 1901. An extremely talented director, animator, producer, voice actor and entertainer, Walt is most famous for his creation of Mickey Mouse, and for being the founder (and namesake) of the Walt Disney Company.

To celebrate the life of this icon, here is a picture of a statue of Walt Disney and Mickey Mouse, at the Disneyland Park in Anaheim, California, USA (October 2012).

Statue of Walt Disney and Mickey Mouse, Disneyland California, USA

Statue of Walt Disney and Mickey Mouse, Disneyland California, USA

Happy Halloween, 31st October 2013!

To celebrate this All Hallows Eve, let’s take a look at some beautiful photos of one of the most beautiful cemeteries I’ve seen: The Waverley Cemetery on the sea-view Cliff Walk off of Bronte Beach, in Sydney, Australia.

With gorgeous views of the sea, The Waverley Cemetery has been named the most-scenic resting place in the world… Not a bad place to spend the rest of eternity. You know, like, six feet under.


Yes yes, this place is too beautiful to be my main Halloween post… But think about all the dead people that inhabit this resting place. I had no issue visiting the cemetery during my Bondi to Bronte Coastal Walk in January 2012, but I’m not so sure I’d be too comfortable visiting at night!

Happy Alaska Day! 

Welcome to Alaska
This is me with some friends (Ryan, Chantelle, and James) at the Canada (Yukon) / Alaska Border, during our visit to the Last Frontier in August 2012.

Today is the international day appreciating teachers. Let’s face it, whether or not we liked school (what, some of us genuinely did!), we all had a number of teachers who made an impact in our lives. Here is to them!

This is King Ram Khamhaeng the Great, the ruler of the Kingdom of Sukhothai (now Thailand) in the 1200s, who is credited with inventing the Thai alphabet. A knowledgeable scholar, his name is a popular household name in every Thai home.

King Ram k, a Scholar Credited with Inventing the Thai Alphabet.

Family Praying to King Ram Khamhaeng at Sukhothai Historic City

Today, King Ram Khamhaeng continues to be a part of daily Thai life, having achieved a faux god-like status: during exam times, school children (and their mothers) will pray for hours to him, asking for the children to perform well in school, especially when it comes to grammar classes!

The 21st of September is the International Day of Peace.

What better place to showcase the need for peace than the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, a beautiful park in downtown Hiroshima, Japan. Hiroshima has raised from the ashes of destruction to be the world’s number one advocate for world peace.

The Flame of Peace Burns On, with the Peace Memorial Museum in Background

The Flame of Peace Burns On, with the Peace Memorial Museum in Background

Today, the Peace Memorial Park brings beauty and life to a place in which less than 70 years ago, the first Atomic Bomb fell over the city, destroying over half the buildings in the city, killing over 80,000 people instantly, and causing the death of another estimated 70,000 – 100,000 people in the following five years, due to injuries and cancers caused by radiation.

This Popular Park is Beautiful, but Also Carries a Strong Message. One of Peace.

On site at the Peace Memorial Park are the UNESCO heritage listed A-Bomb Dome, as a perpetual reminder of the destruction; the cenotaph with all the names of the known victims; the tear-inducing Children’s Peace Monument; and the Peace Memorial Museum. Most importantly, the Park is also home to the Flame of Peace, a burning flame which Hiroshima city has vowed not to put out until every atomic weapon in the world has been destroyed.

I visited Hiroshima, Japan in April 2010 and I loved it. The Peace Memorial Park is beautiful and touching, and the Museum is so overwhelming I actually (literally) had to walk out of it mid way through, about to burst into tears!

Let’s learn from our mistakes, and try every day to celebrate peace.

The Pacific National Exhibition fair is back in Vancouver at its usual home, in the grounds of Playland in East Vancouver.

Welcome to the PNE!

Welcome to the PNE!

The fair experienced some cut backs this year (the one I was most sad about wad the Pyrotechnic Spectacular nightly show, which was worth the entry price alone!). With these cutbacks, the fair is able to provide goers a 20% discount over last year’s prices, so you can now visit the fair for only CDN$16 (CDN$14 if you pre-buy online!).

PNE Superdogs Show

PNE Superdogs Show

The usual attractions are still intact, including the popular Superdogs, the hilarious pig races, as well as the breath-taking Peking Acrobats. The summer night concerts have a number of popular singers gracing the stage at night, and tribute bands also play at night.

You can also walk around the agricultural stages and take a look at the horses, cows, pigs and sheep (yes, that sort of stuff is interesting to city folk like myself!).

New this year is the Sportacular musical / sports show, which was very cool (especially the motorcycle tricks!), and the short but sweet 80’s Forever dance show. These shows combined don’t add up to the canceled Pyrotechnic Spectacular, but they are a great time.

The rotating exhibit this year is about Mongolia’s historic leader Genghis Khan; admission to the exhibit is CDN$3 per person. I found the exhibit to be quite interesting, showcasing a collection of artifacts and weapons that are centuries old.

If you want to go on the rides be prepared to spend extra as the rides are not included in this ticket (you can either pay for a few rides or get an all-in pass). Also, be prepared to spend quite a bit on food, as the usual suspects (wiggle chips, mini donuts, sno-cones, kettle corn, and cotton candy) can get a little pricey. Tip: Make sure to bring a water bottle to refill along the day, as even water costs CDN$4 at the park!

Ryan and Me at the PNE

Ryan and Me at the PNE

Check out the official website of the PNE to see what shows are playing when, so you can plan your trip to the PNE. Also, note that the park will be closed using both Mondays of the run of the PNE, to aid in the cost cutting.

Last weekend, Vancouver dressed up in rainbows to celebrate LGBT Pride once again. Vancouver’s Pride celebrated their 35th anniversary in the city, and this was by far the most incredible Pride I’ve ever been to. From the events leading up to the parade (my favourite being Picnic in the Park, the weekend prior), to the amazing 2013 parade, Vancouver Pride did not disappoint.

Here are some photos of the Pride parade itself, the Pride Marketplace and beer garden party at the end of the parade, as well as random displays of pride around Vancouver’s West End.

Dykes on Bikes Kick off the Parade!

Dykes on Bikes Kick off the Parade!

Love in All its Shades

Love in All its Shades

Pink Feathers

Pink Feathers

Rainbow Flags Aplenty

Rainbow Flags Aplenty

Colourful Flower Costumes

Colourful Flower Costumes

We Stand With Russia

We Stand With Russia

One of the Many Colourful Floats

One of the Many Colourful Floats

Another HUGE Rainbow Flag

HUGE Rainbow Flag

The Pride "Marketplace" and Beer Garden Party

The Pride “Marketplace” and Beer Garden Party

Flags at English Bay

Flags at English Bay

The Iconic 'AMAZE-ing Laughter' Statues Dressed up in Drag for Pride

The Iconic ‘AMAZE-ing Laughter’ Statues Dressed up in Drag for Pride

West End Building Dressed Up for Pride 2013

West End Building Dressed Up for Pride 2013

Davie Street, Vancouver

Davie Street, Vancouver

Davie Village Rainbow Crosswalk

Davie Village Rainbow Crosswalk

Davie Village Rainbow Crosswalk

Davie Village Rainbow Crosswalk

 

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